Monday, September 27, 2010

StruggLing THrough the BookS I haVe bEEn...

trying to finish David Jeremiah's  Captured by Grace and I  still have two other books to read.
Trying to figure why I haven't been able to clear the book. Maybe I have just been too busy doing other stuff. Time to get back to the books. 

Too many distractions...
Too many other things to do...

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Permission to Speak Freely by Anne Jackson

Permission to speak freely is Anne Jackson's narrative about her own life of brokeness and wrestling with rejection and addiction. Her rejection of the Christian faith after experiencing and witnessing the way church politics destroyed her father’s life. Her wanderings in the “wilderness” of addiction and substance abuse.  Her restoration and return to the heavenly Father.  
To be honest it’s not what I expected. I thought the book will be a bunch of theoretical (read boring) essays addressing issue the church (universal) has to face and talk about but isn’t doing so. Instead, What it is is a series of narrative essays taking us through the author's life andher experience with taboos in Conservative Christian Church life in America. However, it is not only America but around the world both East and West. 
The book was well designed crafted and chapters punctuated with poems and prose that fit the theme of the chapter. It made the reading interesting and easier.
I have never finished a book so quickly in such a long time. There was no rush to submit the review,  what motivated me to read so intently was the subject matter.  It was a breath of fresh air, as Anne spoke freely about her broken life and her struggles. Something close to my heart now. Anne addresses a very serious issue in the church today. That is: The Christian church ought to be a community of grace, safe place where it’s members can share freely, the broken and the beautiful in their lives.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

The Butterfly Effect by Andy Andrews


Andy Andrew's The Butterfly Effect is gift book. The book has a clear message not just for older children and teens but even adults. That message is: we were created to make a difference. Whatever you do no matter how insignificant it may seem can have an impact on in the lives of other people on the other side of the world.

The books was an easy read as all gift books are. The book design and graphics were excellent and visually pleasing, supporting the text on each page well. Its layout done in a way it compelled us to keep turning the pages find out the story ends. Andrews brings us through almost 200 years of American history. He does this by relating two seemingly unrelated stories about two seemingly insignificant people and the global effect their lives had on the world as we know it today.

Though Andy Andrews wrote this book with primarily American readers in mind, his message is clearly universal. Even as an asian reader, I felt a sense of gratitude to the Joshua and Moses for their lives and actions did affect the history of my nation too. As a father, I realize I am raising history makers in my home. This is the kind of gift book that is worth getting.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

The Boy Who Changed The World by Andy Andrews, illustrated by Philip Hurst




If anything, this children’s book is the kid’s version of The Butterfly Effect, a gift book by the same author. Written for children of reading age but more suitable for those between the ages of six to nine, it tells the story not one, not two but four boys and their impact they made on the world as we know it today.

The large children’s story book is colorfully illustrated by Philip Hurst. The art pleasant to the eye and done in a manner that adds to the mood of the story at the turn of each page. The story is paced well. Language simple to understand.

I was worried about the part that had some mention of slavery and racism I had read in The Butterfly Effect. The author avoids mention of it all together (which is good, if you don’t want to have to explain these matters to a nine year old). He does so without affecting the essence of the story and the truth he wanted to convey. That truth is: Everything you do matters. It doesn’t matter what you do it will have an impact on someone somewhere some time. The spiritual message was not strong but subtle, God is only mention at the end. I recommend this book to all parents. Get it for your child read it with them.
PS: Look out for the butterflies on every page ;-D
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.